888.501.5544

HPM in the Press & News


HPM Hires Quality-Assurance Pro to Prevent Missed Connections - 1389074940


PHOENIX (Jan. 6, 2014) — Higher Power Marketing has brought Mark Antonelli on board as its new quality-assurance manager.

Antonelli’s role is to ensure that every toll-free phone number and every web address HPM advertises for its clients actually connects to the correct destination. The agency does this to assure both clients and media partners that no responses will be lost in transmission.

“In short, he understands that in order for the end product to work, A must connect to Z, no matter how many points there are in between, ” says Peter Feinstein, HPM’s president and CEO. “And that’s what he does for us. He makes sure that consumers calling or clicking on our client offers get to the right place, every time.”

Based in Austin, Texas, Antonelli has almost two decades of experience as a laboratory supervisor and quality engineer – seven years in aerospace, six in the medical-device industry, three in pharmaceuticals and two in the semiconductor business.

“I have experience with ISO, KEMA and customer audits, as well as supplier reassessment and product complaints,” he says. “I have over 10 years experience in supervision and coordination of testing laboratories and personnel.”

Antonelli is married to a nurse and has four children and six grandsons. Originally from Boston, he lived in California for 20 years before moving to Texas five years ago.

HPM provides customized direct-response (DR) and per-inquiry (PI) media solutions that deliver cost-effective results and predictable success. It delivers access to the widest range of advertising solutions, reaching hundreds of millions of Americans via more than 8,000 radio stations, more than 600 TV stations and all national TV networks.

Higher Power Marketing Hires Manager for Media Partnerships - 1374725700


PHOENIX (July 24, 2013) — Chase Crain is a man with a mission.

As Higher Power Marketing’s new manager in charge of satisfying media partners, he oversees HPM’s day-to-day relationships with the media that carry its clients’ ads.

“We’re counting on Chase to reach out to our media partners and ask them how we can do a better job for them,” says HPM President and CEO Peter Feinstein. “It’s an open book, with no pre-set expectations of what Chase will find – just the clear vision that he’ll keep our media partners loyal fans of what we do.”

Media partners are crucial to HPM’s business plan.

“Without happy, loyal media partners, we aren’t a success,” Feinstein says. “Our great results over the years are due, to a very large degree, to the love and respect our media partners have for HPM.

“It’s taken time to develop that,” he adds. “Chase’s presence is to solidify that loyalty and find out how we can be even better at what we do for them.”

Crain comes to HPM from the online-marketing business, where he managed advertiser relations along with media-partner strategy and optimization. He is based in the Phoenix area.

“I hired him because he’s articulate, animated, enthusiastic and very service-first oriented,” Feinstein says. “He is a great fit with where HPM is presently, and where we’re going as a company.”

HPM provides customized direct-response (DR) and per-inquiry (PI) media solutions that deliver cost-effective results and predictable success. It delivers access to the widest range of advertising solutions, reaching hundreds of millions of Americans via more than 8,000 radio stations, more than 600 TV stations and all national TV networks.

HPM Online Demo Illustrates How iTV Works - 1349929020


PHOENIX (Oct. 10, 2012) — Higher Power Marketing is based in Arizona, not Missouri, but that hasn’t kept it from taking the “Show Me” approach to one of its most innovative advertising platforms. The cost-per-action (CPA) advertising agency has added a demonstration page to its website to demonstrate interactive television (iTV), a cutting-edge platform that enables advertisers to reach views as they interact with their favorite shows.

At some point during a TV program, viewers hear an announcer offer them an opportunity to weigh in on the day’s topic, and receive some special offers, by calling a toll-free telephone number.

“After they give their opinions,” says HPM Presdient and CEO Peter Feinstein, “they hear something along the lines of, ‘Thanks for voting: Before you hang up, we’d like to play you a couple of exclusive offers available only to viewers of this program.’” If they choose to stay on the line, they will hear up to five offers. HPM gets its clients’ messages into the queue, where they move up or down in the pecking order based upon the responses they generate.

Got that? Well, that’s where the demo comes in handy.
“It allows us to send clients to a place [www.hpowermarketing.com/itv.asp] that lets them see exactly how the platform functions,” Feinstein says. “That paints the picture for them, and they can see if it’s a good fit for them.”

Feinstein says the “Show Me” approach is important to reinforce HPM’s introduction to a platform that has so many moving parts.
“If we go through the process of talking about it and then say, ‘I think you can get a clearer understanding of what I just told you. Just go here,’ they can click on the examples and see almost exactly how this functions,” he says. “Every single time we’ve done that, the person has said, ‘Oh, okay. I kind of understood it. Now I get it.’”

CPA is known by a number of names, including per-inquiry (PI), pay-per-lead (PPL) or direct-response (DR) advertising. Basically, HPM has relationships with media outlets and access to their unsold inventory of ad time or space. It fills voids with its clients’ ads. Clients aren’t billed for the placements; rather they pay based upon the number and/or quality of responses.

“This emphasis on results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs, and who want to establish a stable cost per lead within their business plans,” Feinstein says. “The client makes money; the medium makes money; and we make money. Everybody wins.”

Other platforms offered by HPM include: radio, TV, print and mobile.

HPM to Attend Electronic Retailing Show in Las Vegas - 1347078360


PHOENIX (Sept. 7, 2012) — Higher Power Marketing will be present at the Electronic Retailing Association’s annual D2C Convention Sept. 11-13 at the Wynn Las Vegas.

“For the second year in a row, we will have the HPM suite, where we will entertain clients, as well as prospective clients, existing media partners and potential new media partners,” says Peter Feinstein, the cost-per-action (CPA) ad agency’s president and CEO. “Our hope is that we’re able go generate interest enough in the agency to sign up new clients, as well as interest from media partners in taking our existing clients and running their ads on a peripheral basis.”

The ERA event attracts leaders of the direct-to-consumer marketplace, which includes members that maximize revenues through direct-to-consumer marketing on television, online, mobile and on radio. While HPM already has meetings scheduled each day, Feinstein says the agency has spread them around so that opportunities remain to meet with people who express an interest CPA opportunities up to and during the show.

Feinstein says it’s easier to have meaningful, one-on-one conversations in the corporate suite than on the show floor. “We rent the suite because we can bring them into our environment. We can really take care of them, entertain them and give them a place to disconnect from all of the noise – and make it relaxed but productive.”

CPA is known by a number of names, including per-inquiry (PI), pay-per-lead (PPL) or direct-response (DR) advertising. Basically, HPM has relationships with media outlets and access to their unsold inventory of ad time or space. It fills voids with its clients’ ads. Clients aren’t billed for the placements; rather they pay based upon the number and/or quality of responses.

Mobile Audio Gains Ground Amid Radio Ad Crunch - 1341203340


With political spots taking much of the advertising inventory on broadcast radio, savvy cost-per-action (CPA) advertisers are turning their interest to mobile media, where the inventory is elastic and campaign ads are less ubiquitous.

Within that segment, I’m directing clients to mobile audio platforms that run commercials alongside music. While mobile business and gaming apps have potential, they are not yet able to provide the concentration of eyeballs necessary to make CPA advertising effective. Mobile audio platforms can.

My agency, Higher Power Marketing (HPM) specializes in CPA advertising, also known as per-inquiry (PI), pay-per-lead (PPL) or direct-response (DR) advertising. Basically, HPM has relationships with media outlets and access to their unsold inventories of ad time or space. We fill those voids with our clients’ ads. Clients aren’t billed for the placements; rather, they pay based upon the number of responses.
At HPM, we try to work for unified markets, as opposed to fractured or diverse markets. It’s more effective to put a message out in front of a platform that has 93 million users than to seek insertion into a solitaire gaming app that might be used by 10,000 people at any given time.

Apps can look really appealing, especially when you see that they’ve been downloaded by 11 million people. But while download statistics are valuable to developers, they don’t necessarily offer a value to advertisers. What’s important, from our perspective, is how many people are going to be using the app at any given moment, and thus be able to see the ad. Even allowing for a generous response rate, the number of people using a gaming app isn’t going to be sufficient to move the needle.

On a platform such as Pandora, 9.3 million people may be listening at any given time. So when one of our clients’ adds is played, we see some pretty significant results right off the bat.
It’s all based upon minute-by-minute usage at any given time.

How It Works
Unlike the groupings of three or four 60-second commercials on broadcast radio stations, ads on mobile audio platforms are typically either 15 or 30 seconds, and only one or two run at any given time. These ads may come with a full-screen, synched banner ad or a smaller banner ad. Either way, there is a click-to-call mechanism embedded in the banner.

HPM simplifies this process for our clients. Before we sign an agreement with any kind of platform, we get an understanding of what specifications it requires. If they’re using banner ads synched with audio, we’ll find out what dimensions the banner ads need to be and what file sizes and types will work. We database all of that, so we can tell clients off the bat, “This is what we’re going to need from you.”
Interestingly, the great thing about mobile audio is that just about everybody has gone to the 15-second audio message. There is a fair degree of standardization. In terms of sound quality, we’ve found that either MP3 or wav with certain production values works quite well. Plus, HPM integrates its proprietary roadblock technology that requires a consumer to take specific and definitive action in order to get connected to a client’s call center. We have a recipe for success for both the client and our media partner!

At HPM, we have so much experience in audio work because of all the radio that we’ve done that it makes it very simple for us to hit that whole set of criteria very easily. We can write and produce just about everything our clients are doing with audio.

Mobile audio also offers a degree of demographic targeting. We can supply any of these platforms with demographic information, and they can do the targeting for us. They’ll make a determination as to as to what music the ad accompanies. It’s not an exact science, but it’s a refinement over simply filling empty add space.”
For these reasons, mobile audio has emerged as one of the hot new CPA platforms for 2012, and likely beyond. If this sounds good to you, click here for more information.

Cost-Per-Action Advertising Evolves Quickly - 1338611340


It hit me recently just how much my business – cost-per-action advertising – has changed over the last five years.

The principle remains the same: a cost-per-action (CPA) ad agency such as Higher Power Marketing has relationships with media outlets across the country and access to their unsold inventory of ad time or space. It fills voids with its clients’ ads. Clients aren’t billed for the ad placements; rather, they pay based upon the number and/or quality of responses.

This emphasis on results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs, and who want to establish a stable cost per lead within their business plan. The client makes money; the station makes money; and we make money. Everybody wins.

What’s changed so dramatically is the type of media we can offer clients. Five years ago, we specialized in radio, television, print, billboards, movie theaters and a little Internet. Today we do nothing with billboards and movie screens, and print is not nearly as prevalent as it once was – except where we’re able to access the periodical’s online presence. Radio and TV are still very effective, but we’re also exploiting many mobile advertising opportunities available to us, such as audio, video, banners and mobile search engines, to name a few – plus interactive television (aka iTV). Advancing call-transfer technology enables us to pair the right consumer with the right client offer – very one-on-one oriented!

The evolution has been staggering; it’s more like a revolution. The application of technology changes the game every day. Where it was common practice to accept subjective, information-based leads, HPM has used advancements in technology to literally change the playing field. Now more than 95 percent of all lead-generation offers are based upon a realistic length of call that should allow clients to get the information they need or, minimally, weed out unqualified callers.

As a result, we’ve had to modify our basic terminology. We used to call our approach per-inquiry (PI), pay-per-lead (PPL) or direct-response (DR) advertising – which emphasized the quantity of responses. Now we use CPA, which factors in the quality.

So how do we manage all this change? By employing the same strategy that got us through college: “Take it one day at a time.” At HPM, we constantly evaluate emerging media to determine if they offer opportunities for our clients. Individual clients don’t have time to do this – they’re busy running their businesses. Understanding the breadth of media options enables us to match a client’s needs with the most appropriate type of media, whether it is cutting edge or old school.

Sweeps Period, Election Season Squeeze Radio Ad Inventory - 1337661000


Many Advertisers Can Mitigate Impact by Looking to Mobile-Audio Platforms

PHOENIX (May 21, 2012) — The May sweeps period has brought nearly unprecedented demand for advertising time on radio as TV networks and stations try to pump up ratings for their shows. Though the sweeps end May 31, pressure on inventory is likely to continue due to a spike in political advertising during the election year.

“This May sweeps has been the single-largest television-sweep inventory purchase on radio that I’ve seen in nearly eight years,” says Peter Feinstein, president and CEO of Higher Power Marketing. “It is just off the hook!

“And with the primary and general elections on the horizon, political spending almost certainly will impact inventory the same way,” he says.

Feinstein is particularly sensitive to this trend, because HPM specializes in cost-per-action (CPA) advertising, also known as per-inquiry (PI), pay-per-lead (PPL) or direct-response (DR) advertising. Basically, HPM has relationships with media outlets and access to their unsold inventory of ad time or space. It fills voids with its clients’ ads. Clients aren’t billed for the placements; rather they pay based upon the number and/or quality of responses.

“The TV sweeps have dramatically impacted the sales volume for radio ads, which some would consider to be bad news because it takes up inventory that we would otherwise get on a per-inquiry basis,” Feinstein says.

But where others see gloom, Feinstein sees opportunity. He is advising HPM clients to manage this inventory crunch by looking to mobile media, where the inventory is virtually limitless.

“We have done a lot of leg work in trying to establish and expand our relationship with mobile media markets,” he says. “We have the capacity to run mobile audio on any number of different networks. We work aggressively several very large mobile audio platforms. These platforms can dominate marketplaces. Why would you not want to do that?”
It’s not a matter of abandoning radio, he adds, just a desire “to have something that will insulate us, and our clients, from the extraordinary valleys that are created in business when 50 percent of the inventory is taken up by sweeps or political advertising.”

Higher Power Marketing Earns ‘Inc.’ Magazine Ranking - 1314160320


Cost-Per-Action Ad Agency Among Top .05% of Fastest-Growing Private Companies

PHOENIX (Aug. 23, 2011) — Higher Power Marketing, one of the nation’s leading cost-per-action (CPA) advertising agencies, has made the 2010 Inc. 500|5000 list, Inc. magazine’s annual measure of entrepreneurial success.

The Inc. 500|5000 ranks companies according to percentage revenue growth over three years.

“This achievement puts you in rarefied company,” Inc. Editor in Chief Jane Berentson wrote to HPM President and CEO Peter Feinstein, “especially if you consider that there are nearly 7 million private, employer–based companies in the U.S.A. The elite group you’ve now joined has, over the years, included companies such as Microsoft, Timberland, Vizio, Intuit, Jamba Juice, Oracle and Zappos.com. In fact, many of today’s most successful U.S. companies received their first national recognition when they appeared on the Inc. list.”

HPM was No. 3,589 on the Inc. list. It ranked 326th among advertising and marketing firms. HPM was 55th among Phoenix-based companies, a group that included Lifelock, Go Daddy, Massage Envy, Sundt Construction and the law firm Snell & Wilmer.

Responding to the news of the selection and rank, Feinstein beamed and said: “I’m blessed to have a team of people who clearly grasp the company’s vision. We work together to achieve our mission of profitably serving the best interests of our media partners, clients, staff and consumers in general. I call it ‘commerce with a conscience,’ and it means we don’t transact business just to make money; there has to be purpose to it, and there has to be a genuine fit with each client we take on.”

Inc. features the Inc. 500|5000 its September issue and at www.inc.com/inc5000. To qualify, companies must have been founded and generating revenue by March 31, 2007. Additionally, they have to be based in the United States, privately held, for profit and independent. The minimum revenue required for 2007 was $100,000; the minimum for 2010 was $2 million.

What Is Cost-Per-Action Advertising?
Sometimes called per-inquiry (PI), cost-per-lead (CPL) or pay-per-lead (PPL), CPA is a form of direct-response marketing in which the advertiser receives free ad time and space while paying only for results. In return, the advertiser gives up control of where and when the ads will run. HPM has relationships with media outlets and access to their unsold inventory of ad time and space. They place the ads as space becomes available. The advertisers pay only for qualified responses, or “actions.” A CPA strategy allows the client to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL) without the burdensome and unpredictable expense usually associated with ad buying.

Focus Beats Technology in Enabling Virtual Workplaces - 1313037240


HPM Exemplifies How Good People, Structure, Clear Expectations Outperform Gadgetry

PHOENIX (Aug. 10, 2011) — A recent Forrester Consulting study of how businesses manage virtual workplaces shows that many are talking the talk, but not walking the walk. According to entrepreneur Peter Feinstein, who has managed a virtual workforce for more than 12 years, this could come from equating a successful virtual environment with the need for expensive, state-of-the-art collaboration technology when all that’s really required is hiring responsible professionals and setting clear expectations for communicating and meeting deadlines. “I think it’s fascinating how some companies think their technology must be cutting edge in order for a virtual office to work,” says Feinstein, president and chief executive officer of Higher Power Marketing (HPM), an advertising agency founded on a virtual model. “I guess it’s the lure of the bright, shiny object.”

The Forrester study found that more than 70 percent of respondents said having an understanding or proficiency in collaboration technology are a must for employment, but less than 43 percent plan to invest in specific collaboration tools, demonstrating a gap between expectations and action.

“The research suggests that senior leaders and hiring managers accept that a global economy demands virtual teaming, but we believe they may be short-sighted on its benefits,” said Charles Bullock, vice chancellor of academic affairs at California’s Brandman University, which commissioned the Forrester study. The virtual office is a hot topic as businesses look for ways to reduce overhead, cut down on travel and be more environmentally responsible. And while the housing crisis has restricted workforce mobility, the virtual model enables companies to hire the best talent available, regardless of geography.

People Make or Break on Organization

Feinstein advises focusing less on gadgetry and more on personnel. Getting the right people in place – wherever their places may be – offers more return on investment (ROI) over the long haul, he says. Technology depreciates quickly, while humans gain value as they gain experience. He looks for motivated people with the focus and discipline to work independently, as well as the communication skills and accountability to work remotely. Always a bit ahead of the game, Feinstein has built HPM into one of the nation’s leading cost-per-action advertising agencies – with staff in seven states across four time zones – and kept it there amid the rapidly changing media landscape. “We’ve proven that exceptional communication and the capacity to be focused and disciplined are the foundations for success in a virtual environment,” he says.

Indeed, Bullock says, “Innovative companies can leverage virtual teaming as a competitive advantage when the organizational culture promotes trust and communication, and incorporates an array of interactive technologies to foster better collaboration.” Personnel at HPM collaborate with nothing more advanced than a networked server and a modern phone system. “Our server has common space where we can all put files for mutual sharing, reviewing, editing and commenting,” Feinstein says, “and we’re only a few weeks away from implementing a cloud-based telephone system.”

The people at HPM describe a communications environment that is open but structured. “We work together in a team environment, the same if not better than in an office setting,” says Alyssa Brailsford, the firm’s New Hampshire-based media relations director. “Communication is open between members of our team and the edict of a virtual world assists with this.”

Data Processing Director Rod Mel elaborates: “Peter has set guidelines to streamline emails, to try and reduce unnecessarily cc’d emails. All of us know one another and each of our roles in the company, which dictates with whom we communicate on an issue.” Mel works from northern California.

Emphasize Expectations

The Forrester study found concern among managers about establishing accountability with distributed workers: 57 percent said trust was a challenge for managers of virtual teams. Other key concerns included communicating effectively, managing projects and deadlines and creating consensus.

“We maintain a fairly rigorous approach to setting and meeting deadlines,” Feinstein says. “We don’t have problems creating consensus. It’s actually what happens when you have a group of highly professional, intelligent team players. We’ve evolved and now have a very proficient group of people who seek consensus.” To get there, Feinstein suggests asking for daily activity reports as a means for correlating reported activity to self-evident accomplishment. After a time, he says, a manager will have a sense of what activity is resulting in what productivity and can scale back reporting or even eliminate it.

Stephanie Klein, HPM’s New Jersey-based vice president of operations, says each staffer pulls his or her own weight. “We are definitely a team. And Peter strives to set that up so that we aren’t coming to him with everything,” she says. “He’s spent a lot of time and energy building a virtual team he can trust to run HPM daily without him needing to micromanage. That is a lot more difficult with virtual offices, and it has come partly through trial and error.”

Executives in the survey also were concerned about missing intangibles, such as cultural or body language cues and the absence of “water cooler” or more informal communications. And only 35 percent viewed virtual teaming as an important strategy to provide employee flexibility and job satisfaction. “I share the concerns with the missing intangibles,” Feinstein says, but that is just part of the virtual situation. “Even video conferencing is not the same as the in-person experience.” Folks at HPM are willing to trade that water-cooler camaraderie for the benefits of working at home. Without having to commute, people start their shifts less stressed and more productive. “Everyone gets to work during their peak efficiency, during the business hours of his or her time zone,” Feinstein says from his home office in Arizona. That not only reduces the financial and environmental costs of commuting but also stretches the hours available for customer service.

“We are all in different time zones and work on flex hours to fit our individual situations,” Mel notes. “There always seems to be someone online at any given time, so issues are acknowledged for clients pretty quickly.” Klein appreciates “the trust that I’m doing my job without someone literally looking over my shoulder.” Indeed, Feinstein suspects that many of the executives surveyed may be focusing too much on what will benefit the company’s bottom line and not enough on what will make high-quality people want to work for them. “I strongly suggest the employer and top executive team possess and communicate an attitude of gratitude in working with the entire team. With everyone spread out, any element of dissatisfaction can bring an entire department down” Feinstein says. “It really is so much easier to be kind, caring and compassionate with people. Everyone is deserving of respect and admiration for what they do in our company, and I make sure I communicate that both individually, and recognize it to the full staff.”

###

CONTACT: Peter Feinstein, 888-501-5544 or pf@hpowermarketing.com.

Higher Power Marketing is one of the nation’s leading cost-per-action (CPA) advertising agencies. Sometimes called perinquiry (PI), cost per lead (CPL) or pay-per lead (PPL), CPA is a form of direct-response marketing in which the advertiser receives free ad time and space while paying only for results. In return, the advertiser gives up control of where and when the ads will run. Agencies that offer PI have relationships with media outlets and access to their unsold inventory of ad time and space. They place the ads as space becomes available. The advertisers pay only for qualified responses, or “actions.” A CPA strategy allows the client to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL) without the burdensome and unpredictable expense usually associated with ad buying.

Brandman University, which commissioned the study, is a private, non-profit institution established in 1958. Part of the Chapman University system, Brandman offers a progressive, innovative curriculum and strong support services designed for working professionals. The university serves more than 10,000 students in more than 200 undergraduate and graduate degree, certificate, credential and professional development programs in arts and sciences, business, education and health, offered online and at 26 campuses in California and Washington. For the school’s take on the Forrester survey, and a link to the study itself, visit www.brandman.edu/PressReleases/Forrester.asp.

Per-Inquiry Ad Agency HPM Nominated for Two Awards - 1307421420


Firm Recognized for Entrepreneurial Success, Business Ethics

PHOENIX (June 6, 2011) — Higher Power Marketing, one of the nation’s leading per-inquiry (PI) advertising agencies, has been nominated for the 2010 Inc. 500|5000 list, Inc. magazine’s annual measure of entrepreneurial success.

The Inc. 500|5000 is ranked according to percentage revenue growth over three years. To qualify, companies must have been founded and generating revenue by March 31, 2007. Additionally, they had to be based in the United States, privately held, for profit and independent. The minimum revenue required for 2007 is $100,000; the minimum for 2010 is $2 million.

“I’m so appreciative of the recognition; even just the nomination is a great tribute to the HPM team.” said Peter Feinstein, President/CEO. “We all work hard to hit a home run in fulfilling our mission of profitably serving the best interests of our media partners, clients, consumers and staff! We’ll see if we make Inc/’s grade a little later in the year. And even if we don’t get a nod from Inc., the nomination alone is a noteworthy achievement our entire team can be proud to own!” Inc. will publish the list in its September 2011 issue and on Inc.com.

Last year, 12-year-old HPM was nominated for a Torch Light Ethics Award from the Better Business Bureau. The award recognizes businesses that maintain a solid commitment to conducting their business practices in an ethical fashion. HPM maintains an A+ rating from the BBB.

When asked to comment, Feinstein said, “It’s a very simple matter for us: We simply do what we say we’re going to do. It’s not that difficult when you have a commitment to doing ‘commerce with a conscience’. The nomination was another acknowledgement to a great team that puts principles ahead of personalities, and sometimes ahead of profits… when it means doing the right thing and keeping our word.”

Cost-Per-Action Formula Pleases Advertisers, Media Alike - 1302064620


Higher Power Marketing’s Unique Process ‘Bridges’ Gap Between Payment Preferences

PHOENIX (April 5, 2011) — Higher Power Marketing (HPM) has found a way to resolve the built-in paradox that has limited the effective use of cost-per-sale advertising programs.

According to HPM President and Chief Executive Officer Peter Feinstein: “Clients think it’s the coolest thing since sliced bread to pay a media outlet on a per-sale basis. … they think it’s a no-risk way to generate sales. What they don’t understand is that they’re actually jeopardizing the vitality of their business by pitting themselves against the media.”

prefer to be paid on a per-call basis,” because they don’t like being held hostage to a call center’s ability (or lack thereof) to close a sale.

“We don’t get to choose the call center; we don’t get to write the telemarketing script; and we don’t hire or train the operators,” Feinstein recalls a radio executive grumbling. “There’s no way I’m going to let my network be on the hook for them closing sales. Just pay me per call and let it go at that. If you can do that, I’ll run their offer whenever I have time.”

So Feinstein and the team at HPM crafted the “Bridge” – a formula designed to satisfy clients and media partners, bringing them together instead of pitting them against each other, as they are in the traditional pay-per-sale model. The HPM Bridge pays media partners for every call they send to the client, but correlates that payment to the client’s revenue per call (RPC) – thereby maintaining the cost-per-order relationship.

How It Works

HPM’s system looks at the client’s inbound call volume and sales revenue to establish a revenue-per-call benchmark. Feinstein explains: “The Bridge is the amount we charge the client. It’s always a flat fee per-call, based upon their revenue per call. We keep a small margin for ourselves and pass the vast majority of the money onto our media partners.”

He says clients doing this love it because they receive as much as 25 percent to 60 percent more inbound calls than they would from a traditional cost-per-sale program, so their call-center sellers get a lot more practice with real, live potential customers, and consequently close more sales. Since the HPM Bridge fills the client’s sales funnel with more prospects, the call center and the client benefit too.

At the same time, Feinstein points out, media partners are finally getting what they want: solidly performing client offers that pay them on a per-call basis. HPM has media partners across the country willing to plug its clients’ ads into their unsold inventories of ad space or time.

“They love it! And they support it with lots of media,” he says. “They run the spot with much more frequency than their traditional pay-per-order programs. We’re able to secure bigger media outlets, and we receive more time and/or space, simply by agreeing to pay them for every answered call they send to our client,” Feinstein adds.

“They know we keep meticulous track of all call activity; they trust our reporting; and they know, from working with us for more than a decade, that they can rely on getting paid every month.”
Traditional cost-per-sale programs don’t receive nearly as much media interest, Feinstein says. The outlets accepting those programs are smaller and typically don’t run the ads frequently enough to make the program really work effectively.

“Whenever we’re approached about entering into a cost-per-order or cost-per-sale program, we move the offer to a pay-per-call, based upon the client’s RPC,” Feinstein says. “That accomplishes everyone’s goals. Trite as it sounds, it’s a win-win-win.”

Feinstein says product marketers “owe it to themselves to at least investigate this methodology with a quick call to me at 1-888-501-5544. Or, they can drop me an email at peterf@hpowermarketing.com.”

Media outlets looking to be paid per call instead of per order can reach out to George Eldredge, HPM’s vice president of media, at 1-888-501-5544 or george@hpowermarketing.com.

Higher Power Marketing Taps Kona Financial to Do Bookkeeping - 1296621600


PHOENIX (Feb. 1, 2011) — Higher Power Marketing has engaged Phoenix-based Kona Financial to do its bookkeeping.

“Working with Kona has been a wonderful, positive experience for our agency,” says HPM President and CEO Peter Feinstein. “Their pro-activity has freed me to refocus my efforts on maximizing revenues, minimizing expenses and extending the vitality of the company in other areas.”

Phoenix-based HPM is one of the nation’s leading per-inquiry (PI) advertising agencies.

A PI campaign places ads at no charge to the client; instead, the client pays for responses. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country and access to their unsold inventories of ad space or time. It places a client’s ad in those spots until an agreed-upon number of responses is reached.

For more information, visit www.hpowermarketing.com or contact Peter Feinstein at 888-501-5544 or pf@hpowermarketing.com.

Higher Power Marketing Brings on New Vice President of Media - 1296103320


PHOENIX (Jan. 26, 2011) — George Eldredge has joined Higher Power Marketing (HPM) as vice president of media. He brings HPM six years of experience in the industry – mostly on the advertising agency side, working with radio, TV, print, Internet and mobile-media companies.

Mr. Eldredge is taking on a wide range of responsibilities, among them: fine tuning HPM’s relationships with existing media partners and helping to engage new ones; overseeing the agency’s media cataloging process; and acting as team leader for the media-relations, database and traffic directors.

“George’s integrity and professional experience are big assets to our firm, as is his as ability to provide support for our services industry-wide,” says HPM President and CEO Peter Feinstein. “His understanding of people, as well as his grasp of the importance of what it takes to run a business, is a welcome addition. With an extensive background in, and success with e-commerce marketing as well as TV, George has been, and will continue to be a key player in the PI industry, we’re ecstatic to have him on our team!”

PI Primer

A PI campaign places ads at no charge to the client; instead, the client pays for responses. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country and access to their unsold inventories of ad space or time. It places a client’s ad in those spots until an agreed-upon number of responses is reached.

This emphasis on results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs. It also enables the client to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL) without the burdensome and unpredictable expense associated with buying advertising – a crucial benefit when expense-line items are under scrutiny. HPM’s model converts a client’s expense line-item into a profit center!

HPM’s Feinstein to Blog Response Expo 2010 - 1272602580


Veteran Ad Executive Will Report News, Buzz from May 11-13 Trade Show

Phoenix (April 29, 2010) — Veteran DR advertising executive Peter Feinstein, president and chief executive officer of Higher Power Marketing (HPM), will reprise his role as official blogger at Response Expo, the key annual conference for people in the direct-response marketing industry.
Response Expo 2010 will be May 11-13 at the Hilton Bayfront in San Diego.
After offering his take last year on the speakers, seminars and exhibitors – as well as the buzz on parties and networking events – Feinstein plans several upgrades to his Response Expo coverage.

“There is great potential to really dig into the meat of the conference and help more attendees get an enhanced sense of purpose for being there,” Feinstein says. “I want people to feel more connected to the expo rather than just attending to network.”
Among the improvements for 2010:

A dedicated Twitter feed will complement his long-form blog available via RSS or the Internet. “Blogging last year’s conference was a tremendous experience,” Feinstein says. “Attendees were only too happy to be interviewed, giving me their opinion on the state of the industry, their take on their business and their feelings about Response Expo. With the variety of information the I was getting, I realized the benefits of employing multiple distribution formats.”
News and commentary will be augmented by interviews with featured speakers from the conference. “This year’s program features some of the best from inside and outside our industry,” he says. “I want to use that depth to promote increased attendance at individual seminars being held throughout the expo.”
To help cover all the bases, Jay Levin, president and chief operating officer of Los Angeles-based MediaPoint Network, will join Feinstein as co-blogger. “Over the past three years, Jay and I have developed a great working relationship,” Feinstein says. “I’ve been impressed with the vigor Jay brings to the creative process. Our brainstorming has brought to light some potentially powerful opportunities to really stimulate attendance, participation and overall buzz at the conference.”

Complementary Perspective.
Levin brings more than 20 years of local, regional, national and international advertising, marketing and management experience to Response Expo. He cites four goals for himself and Feinstein:

Provide coverage for folks who cannot attend all the major sessions or make the show itself;
Supply a creative perspective that stimulates critical thinking;
Enhance a sense of community by prompting discussion and dialogue; and
Capture the attention of people in the industry unfamiliar with the event and its value.

“I see Peter and I operating like a John Madden/Al Michaels team bringing live play and color commentary,” Levin says. “Peter and I are industry veterans who operate with the same degree of professionalism and down-to-earth realism. I’m happy to contribute my creative take on concepts, content and live play direction.”
Response Expo is presented annually by Response Magazine, the trade “bible” of the direct-response marketing industry, and the Direct Response Marketing Alliance (DRMA), a federation of industry-leading direct-response (DR) marketers. During the three-day event, Feinstein and Levin will post several times a day. Folks attending the expo or keeping tabs from afar can follow their coverage at twitter.com/hpowermarketing.

“There is so much information to absorb that it can be downright exhausting,” Feinstein says. “Jay and I will try to cut through the chatter and reinforce the key points from the conference.”
A special contributor of op-ed columns to Response, Feinstein maintains a blog on his agency’s Web site, www.hpowermarketing.com/blog. He often voices the need to keep one’s perspective in the fast-moving, high-pressure world of direct marketing to best serve the interests of all parties – clients, marketers and media partners.
He is a passionate advocate for per-inquiry (PI) advertising, also known as direct-response or pay-per-lead (PPL) advertising. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print and mobile media – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space or time. A PI campaign puts ads in those spots at no charge to the client; instead, he or she pays for responses to the advertising. The client’s ad runs until the agreed upon number of responses is reached, allowing that client to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL) – without the heavy and unpredictable expense usually associated with buying advertising – a crucial benefit when money is tight.

HPM Founder Featured in National Trade Magazine - 1265777100


Op-Ed Column Contrasts Pay-Per-Lead, Pay-Per-Sale Ad Campaigns

PHOENIX (Feb. 9, 2010) — The February issue of Response magazine, a leading publication for the direct-marketing industry, features a column by Higher Power Marketing founder Peter Feinstein that offers unique insight about how to structure a per-inquiry (PI) advertising campaign.

A PI campaign places ads at no charge to the client; instead, the client pays for responses. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country and access to their unsold inventories of ad space or time. It places a client’s ad in those spots until an agreed-upon number of responses is reached. This allows the client to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL) without the burdensome and unpredictable expense usually associated with buying advertising – a crucial benefit when money is tight.

“I was deep in conversation with a prospect a few months back when our talk turned to the real nuts and bolts of a PI advertising program,” says Feinstein, president and CEO of HPM. “He asked me a question only two other prospects or clients had asked me in nearly 10 years: ‘Would media outlets prefer to receive a higher bounty for a sale or a lower payout on a lead?’”
Feinstein’s column answers that question, offering contrasting scenarios to show why one is better than the other. You can read his explanation at http://bit.ly/9xtcvk .

HPM Receives ‘Best of Business’ Award - 1262753160


Small-business group recognizes agency’s innovation in generating leads for clients

PHOENIX (Jan. 5, 2010) — The Small Business Commerce Association (SBCA), a San Francisco-based group that offers tactical guidance to small-business owners, has recognized Phoenix-based Higher Power Marketing (HPM), a leading innovator in the per-inquiry (PI) advertising business, with its 2009 Best of Business Award in the marketing consulting services category.

“Other agencies come to us for our perspective on utilizing technology,” says HPM President and CEO Peter Feinstein. “We invest a majority of the company’s capital developing and implementing useful technology; I think some see us as the leader in technology and the leader in media partnerships. I believe this award is in recognition of that leadership.”

A PI campaign places ads at no charge to the client; instead, the client pays for responses. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country and access to their unsold inventories of ad space or time. It places a client’s ad in those spots until an agreed-upon number of responses is reached. This allows the client to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL) without the burdensome and unpredictable expense usually associated with buying advertising.

HPM’s emphasis on results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs. Feinstein says companies are accustomed to paying more for advertising because they divide the cost of expensive airtime or print space by the number of customer responses and arrive at a de facto cost per lead. HPM’s methodology flips the paradigm, starting with a static cost per lead or sale. The real emphasis is on lead generation – filling client pipelines.

“We have converted three of HPM’s former per-sale clients in the last 90 days to lead generation – cost per call – and they are seeing all the benefits that we’d described to them. It’s working out, far and away, to everyone’s benefit because we’re filling their sales pipelines with many more leads,” Feinstein says. “We’re able to do that because our media partners are much more interested in running cost-per-call offers than per-order or per-sale programs. With increased media support comes increased consumer response.”

Packages can be structured for a variety of results ¬– per inquiry (any response), per lead (name and contact information) and even per sale. But Feinstein says HPM’s media partners – which include national cable systems, large radio networks, a variety of satellite TV properties and fairly extensive newspaper and magazine networks – prefer to be paid for leads, or better yet, calls. “They don’t like being held responsible for a call center or Web page’s ability to close a sale,” he says. With the focus on lead-generation, “The client makes money; the media partner makes money; and we make money,” Feinstein says. “Everybody wins.”

The SBCA award program recognizes the top 5 percent of small businesses throughout the country. Using various means of research, including consumer feedback, the SBCA identifies companies that it believes have demonstrated what makes small businesses a vital part of the American economy. The selection committee chooses the award winners from nominees based upon information taken from monthly surveys administered by the SBCA, a review of consumer rankings, and other consumer reports. Award winners are valuable assets to their communities and exemplify what makes small businesses great.

Higher Power Marketing announces plans to expand into the Canadian Television Market - 1252558080


September 2009 Phoenix, AZ

As always Higher Power Marketing is committed to giving our clients top of the line service. This includes uncovering new markets to help our clients expand their customer base.

Toronto, Ontario Canada is the 4th largest market in North America with households spending at least 1/3 more annually than the largest US cities.

Our Canadian TV partner reaches over 1.7 million homes in Southern Ontario and Nova Scotia with a potential reach of over 4 million people. Their demograpahic includes both men and women who make up 46% and 54% of their viewership respectively. Almost 1/2 (46%) of viewers have a household income of $60,000 or greater, with almost half of those viewers (20%) having a household income of $100,000 or more, with over a 60% majority falling into the 18-44 category.

Some major benefits of advertising with our Canadian TV partner:

The only 24/7 advertising station broadcasting in both analogue and digital
The only half hour spots available in prime time and mid-day hours
Highly effective station for repeat advertisers over the last 11 years
Dedicated team of Direct Response specialists can help advertisers get measurable results in the first week of airings
Timeslots can be aligned around specific demographics and viewer profiles from other channels

Canada is an untapped market. An opportunity we feel our clients should be taking advanatage of to increase their revenue stream.

PI Can Help Lawyers Locate Plaintiffs at Lower Cost - 1245991740


Seminar at AAJ Convention in San Francisco Will Explain How

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. (June 25, 2009)—Are you a personal injury attorney or law firm seeking per-inquiry (PI) marketing and advertising? Are you a pharmaceutical-injury lawyer? Last Second Media Inc. (LSM), the new business-development arm of Higher Power Marketing (HPM), will feature a private seminar titled “Using Direct Response Media for Mass Tort Case Acquisition” at the 2009 convention of the American Association for Justice.

The seminar for plaintiff bar members, at 3 p.m. on Sunday, July 26, will show how Last Second Media can deliver new case inquiries from direct-response (DR) marketing. In this proven model, law firms pay little or nothing for their advertising unless they acquire a valid lead.

The private seminar will be lead by Frank Pournelle and is subtitled “The Secret Advertising Weapons of Per Inquiry Case Acquisition.”

Pournelle has used national television advertising to acquire thousands of personal-injury cases for law firms including the Law Offices of James Sokolove, the Law Offices of Robert Goldwater, Jim Adler, Philips and Associates, as well as Parilman and Associates.

The plaintiffs’-lawyer marketing program rapidly acquires tort-liability, product-liability, medical-malpractice and wrongful-death cases involving pharmaceuticals, consumer products and insurance. The trial-lawyer marketing program can power personal-injury law practices or co-counsel lawyer advertising at a fraction of the cost using traditional DR television advertising.

LSM founder and President Frank Pournelle has honed his process and system of using direct-response media to help attorneys secure thousands of new cases since 2001. His experience in medical tort-liability case acquisition includes Duragesic Pain Patch, Digitek, Chantix, Asbestosis, Mesothelioma and Silicosis; Vioxx / Celebrex / Bextra; Fen Phen / PPH; Zyprexa / Seroquel ; ACE Inhibitors; Baycol / Rhabdomyolysis; and Paxil / Zoloft. Medical malpractice and product liability experience includes ATV rollover, contact lens solution, defribulator and hernia patch cases.

“Our specialized direct marketing firm has delivered thousands of new tort-liability cases for legal firms,” Pournelle says. “With one call, we can create commercial scripts with both emotional appeal and self-selecting criteria; shoot sharp TV and Web video spots; develop an excellent call center screening process; enlist hundreds of broadcasters nationally; deploy hundreds of memorable toll-free numbers for tracking; and access potential cases months ahead of the competition. We practice the science of law-firm marketing to start generating new leads today for a client.”

LSM powered by HPM implements a unique yield-analysis program called Broadcast ROI, to provide case-volume estimates. The LSM econometrics department is also the first to develop the Depleting Inventory Model for maximizing lead volume at a lower cost while providing an early advantage on still-developing product recalls, toxic torts and product-liability incidents.

Lead inflow can be rapid. Additionally, by tapping HPM’s radio inventory on more than 230 radio stations across 26 states (www.Direct-Response-Radio.com), LSM’s clients can be on air in a matter of days. Over a 90-day period, thousands of television, cable, satellite and radio broadcasters can be added.

In the long term, LSM can outlast client competition by eliminating the risk of advertising with PI media programs that allow a law firm to pay only when customers respond to advertising.

“Per inquiry is an unfair advantage for national lawyer advertising,” Pournelle says. “A client can profitably obtain new cases long after competitors stop running cash media to secure tort-liability cases. Economically, PI increases a law firm’s profit margin with lower costs, greater longevity and greater reach. We are openly experts at marketing legal services nationally.”

Unlike a traditional Internet marketing and advertising company, LSM combines HPM’s multiple offline media to stimulate and drive response for clients rather than serve existing demand or simply create comparison shopping for counsel on the Web.

This strategic combination of PI radio, TV and print with Web video marketing powerfully drives mass tort actions, product liability and product recall litigation. The LSM program may now be deployed to secure mass tort liability cases on a pay-per-call (PPC) basis.

LSM delivers massive economies in comparison with traditional advertising by creating a pseudo-partnership between broadcasters and law firms using millions of dollars in unsold advertising inventory to reach injured parties, their families and their caregivers.

In short, LSM specializes in securing and managing pay-per-lead (PPL) media campaigns by leveraging HPM’s proprietary television, radio, newspaper, mobile networks and LSM’s Web video for lawyer advertising.

In the main, a client firm pays for each valid or qualified lead after testing. More importantly, the proven operation process of LSM will target, attract, qualify and process candidates so that attorneys can concentrate on managing their business and law practice with no additional staff or learning curve.

To date, LSM estimates it has helped secure more than $100 million in legal settlements for attorneys, their law firms and afflicted families. The per-inquiry Trial Lawyer Advertising Program by LSM is a secret weapon for plaintiffs’ lawyers.

To attend this private seminar on securing national tort-liability cases through direct marketing, contact Frank Pournelle at 1-800-334-4500 or visit www.Direct-Response-Radio.com, www.LastSecondMedia.TV or www.WebVideoLaunch.com.

TV Advertising Evolves with Digital Shift - 1245387000


Stations Look to Per-Inquiry Agencies Such as HPM to Fill Time on ‘Subchannels’

PHOENIX (June 18, 2009) — Higher Power Marketing, the 10-year-old per-inquiry (PI) marketing and advertising agency, is experiencing significant growth in broadcasting as television stations begin offering “subchannels” – additional digital or high-definition (HD) broadcasts that, along with the primary digital signal, can occupy the space previously taken up by a single analog signal.

Since TV stations nationwide switched off their analog signals and moved to digital last week, national advertisers are filling unsold time on untested digital subchannels and HD broadcast signals with the help of PI agencies such as HPM.

A PI campaign places ads at no charge to the client; instead, the client pays for responses. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country and access to their unsold inventories of ad time. It places the client’s ad in those spots until the agreed upon number of responses is reached. This allows the client to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL) without the burdensome and unpredictable expense usually associated with ad buying.

The switch from analog has created a new, digital frontier for PI.

“It has the potential of creating a WIN-WIN situation for our media partners and clients; media partners get national-quality, HD advertising content, which looks great on their subchannels, while our clients receive more and more exposure on a pure performance basis,” says HPM President Peter Feinstein. “A brand new digital TV subchannel or HD channel may have a limited track record for local advertisers. Rather than give away the ad time to current advertisers or devalue its worth, we offer an immediate opportunity to generate income with national, corporate offers that pay per call, per lead or per order.”

With the digital transition, commercial and even public-broadcasting stations have new opportunities to earn advertising revenue. But with evolving redistribution contracts by local cable networks and satellite carriers, these digital channels have a hard time measuring audience and household levels.

“Per-inquiry advertising takes the onus off stations to manage affidavits, household delivery, carriage licenses and even protect advertising rate cards for these new digital TV subchannels,” Feinstein says. “Some stations even look at our-per inquiry advertising as free content.”

For national corporate advertisers, these new digital TV subchannels offer another venue for reducing their advertising risk while growing their market share.

“Advertising always works at the right price,” says HPM Client Development Specialist Frank Pournelle. “Mortgage companies, national law firms, even medical and insurance providers have all expressed support in placing their direct-response TV commercials on newer digital tiers. Because they pay only for each lead or call, they view digital subchannels and HD broadcast signals as just one more venue in driving sales and profits.”

According to Wikipedia, some common uses for subchannels include showing simultaneous sporting events, such as the early rounds of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament; small-market TV stations broadcasting programming from two or more networks, some of which might have been unavailable in their markets before; and supplemental news, weather or educational programming.

“As the audience evolves on these channels, direct response clients enjoy a first-mover’s advantage and broadcasters earn more revenue on a performance or per-inquiry basis,” Feinstein says.

HPM’s Feinstein to Blog From Response Expo 2009 - 1241758440


Veteran Ad Executive Will Report News, Buzz from May 19-21 Trade Show

Phoenix (May 7, 2009) — Veteran advertising executive Peter Feinstein will blog from Response Expo 2009, the electronic direct marketing conference in San Diego May 19-21, offering his take on the educational offerings, speakers and exhibitors, as well as the buzz on parties and networking events.

The conference is presented annually by Response Magazine, the trade “bible” of the direct-response marketing industry; its parent company, business-to-business integrated-media provider Questex Media Group; and the Direct Response Marketing Alliance (DRMA), a federation of industry-leading direct-response (DR) marketers.

Feinstein is president and chief executive officer of Higher Power Marketing (HPM), an Arizona-based per-inquiry (PI) advertising agency with a national network of clients and media partners. HPM is a select sponsor of Response Expo 2009.

During the three-day event, Feinstein will post several times a day. Folks attending the expo or keeping tabs from afar can link to his blog from the Response Web site, www.responsemagazine.com.

“A comprehensive conference and trade show like the annual Response Expo can cause sensory overload,” Feinstein says. “There is so much information to absorb that it can be downright exhausting.”

He hopes his blog posts will cut through the chatter and reinforce the key points he takes from the convention’s varied programming.

“My goal is to report on the pulse of the show, get a sense of where the attendees heads and hearts are, and share my insights about what’s going on, as well as the undercurrents – the things everyone might see but not be aware of,” Feinstein says. “I feel pretty blessed to be asked to do this for the show and will work hard to make my points quickly, clearly and without a lot double-speak. I may end up ruffling some feathers, but that’s part of the fun of being straightforward and honest.”

An occasional contributor of op-ed columns to Response, Feinstein maintains a blog on his agency’s Web site, www.hpowermarketing.com/blog. He often voices the need to keep one’s perspective in the fast-moving, high-pressure world of direct marketing to best serve the interests of all parties – clients, marketers and media partners.

He is a passionate advocate for PI advertising, also known as direct-response or pay-per-lead (PPL) advertising. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print and mobile media – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space or time. A PI campaign puts ads in those spots at no charge to the client; instead, he or she pays for responses to the advertising. The client’s ad runs until the agreed upon number of responses is reached, allowing that client to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL) – without the heavy and unpredictable expense usually associated with buying advertising – a crucial benefit when money is tight.

Higher Power Inks Deal for Client Development - 1237959900


Last Second Media to Grow Business Base for Per-Inquiry Ad Agency

PHOENIX (March 24, 2009) — Higher Power Marketing, a leading per-inquiry (PI) advertising agency, has engaged Las Vegas-based Last Second Media Inc. to handle its client development.

“LSM is going to become the sales force for HPM, uncovering and developing new clients for our various direct-response and per-inquiry media platforms,” says Peter Feinstein, HPM’s president and chief executive officer. “That is their real forte. Bringing them on board gives us dedicated staff to handle the inflow of new customers, as well as a focused ability to pursue new and strategic client relationships.”

Feinstein says the move will enable him to dedicate more time to bigger-picture company initiatives, but he promises that HPM will continue to provide the same high-quality advertising results and customer service that its clients have come to expect.

“We’re not changing our colors,” he says. “The vast majority of what we do is per inquiry.”

PI advertising also is known as pay-per-lead (PPL) or direct-response (DR) advertising. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print and mobile media – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space or time. A PI campaign puts ads in those spots at no charge to the client; instead, the client pays for responses to the advertising. The client’s ad runs until the agreed upon number of responses is reached, allowing him or her to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL) without the burdensome and unpredictable expense usually associated with ad buying.

What qualifies as a response is negotiated between each client and HPM. Packages can be structured for a variety of results: per inquiry (any response), per call or Web inquiry, per lead (name and contact information) – even per sale.

“Right now is a big opportunity for DRTV and DR radio advertisers to experience enormous growth and prosperity,” says Frank Pournelle, president of LSM. “With HPM’s power-packed suite of performance media options, we can save a client thousands in media and earn them millions more. By marrying old and new media with an accountable methodology, we can rapidly position a sales organization for success while others are failing.”

With more than 25 years of direct marketing experience, Pournelle is a nationally recognized figure in DR radio, DRTV and Web video. He is known for his ability to use DR media to deliver unprecedented return on investment (ROI) for clients. He also is the architect of LeadGenius®, a patent-pending process for verifying, scoring and promoting sales using artificial intelligence on Internet-generated marketing programs. In addition, he runs several other businesses, including WebVideoLaunch, LifeGuardian, Direct Response Radio and RoyaltyPoint.

To learn more about how a relationship with Last Second Media and HPM could jump-start your lead generation and sales efforts through DR and PI advertising, please visit www.LastSecondMedia.tv.

Letter to the Editor of BusinessWeek - 1236059940


Ad Networks Are Transforming Online Advertising

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_09/b4121048726676.htm
Networks that buy space on lots of tiny sites are changing the business—and putting pressure on ad rates

March 2, 2009

Dear Editor,

One of the negatives cited in your March 2 article “The Squeeze on Online Ads” – the inability to tell advertisers exactly where and when their messages will appear – can be turned into a positive through per-inquiry (PI) advertising, also known as pay-per-lead (PPL) or direct-response (DR) advertising.

Like the advertising networks, a PI ad agency has relationships with media outlets and access to their unsold inventories of ad space or time. It will place ads in those spots at no charge to the client. But rather than paying for clicks, the client pays only for firm responses. What qualifies as a response is negotiated between client and agency. Packages can be structured for a variety of results: per inquiry (any response), per call or Web inquiry, per lead (name and contact information) – even per sale.

A PI ad runs until the agreed upon number of responses is reached, allowing the advertiser to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL) without the burdensome and unpredictable expense usually associated with buying advertising – a crucial benefit when money is tight.

HPM Hire Brings Expertise in Two Critical Areas - 1225432800


PHOENIX (Oct. 30, 2008) — Higher Power Marketing has brought Paul Leonardi on board to be manager of traffic and information technologies, a newly created position.

Leonardi will relieve Operations Manager Stephanie Klein of traffic management responsibilities, allowing her to concentrate more on HPM’s day-to-day functions. He also will bring the Phoenix-based per-inquiry (PI) advertising agency the expertise to integrate today’s quickly evolving technology to benefit clients and media partners alike.

“He and I have already begun to forge a strong relationship that will make the transitioning of traffic responsibilities a smooth one,” Klein says.
PI is a form of direct-response advertising in which the client receives free ad time and space while paying only for results. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print and mobile media – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space. The agency acquires the rights to the unsold time and/or space for its clients, which pay only for qualified responses. The approach also is known as cost per lead (CPL), pay per lead (PPL) or cost per action (CPA).

Leonardi brings HPM more than eight years of IT know-how and has worked in traffic management – essentially, getting the right ads to the correct media outlets – for more than five years.

“In PI advertising, traffic management is pivotal,” Leonardi explains. “Since we have to track every action taken by consumers contacting our clients, we have to make sure that the correct ad – with its unique toll-free number or Web address – reaches its assigned media outlet. If an ad goes to the wrong media outlet, then we cannot track the source of each lead accurately.”
Peter Feinstein, HPM’s president and chief executive officer, echoes Klein’s enthusiasm about Leonardi, saying that creating the new job for him was “an inspiration.”

“I’ve known Paul for more than three years, admire his work ethic and experience, and value the expertise he brings to the company,” Feinstein says. “He is the ideal candidate to handle both aspects of this demanding new position.”

In keeping with HPM’s practice of utilizing the best talent wherever that person may be living, Leonardi will work for the Phoenix-based agency from Jacksonville Beach, Fla.

Ask Not What Technology Can Do, But How It Can Work for You - 1222927260


Attending an industrywide conference and trade show is akin to volunteering for sensory overload. You want to take advantage of all the opportunities – exhibits, presentations, networking opportunities and social events – but there is so much to absorb that it can be downright exhausting.

So, following the recent Response Expo 2008 in San Diego, I took a few moments to sit down and digest what I had absorbed concerning the state of our industry.

As I thought about what might lie ahead, a few trends became clear.

We face a paradox as technology takes an ever-increasing role in measuring performance. While the Internet speeds the communication of results, this very speed distracts us from the underlying reasons for a campaign’s apparent success or failure. There is more focus on the quantitative results than on gaining a qualitative understanding of “how” and “why.”

I certainly embrace the use of technology; my own per-inquiry (PI) advertising agency is the only one I know of to have its entire roster of advertisers, in every medium we handle, online for our media partners to review and even order commercials.

But we don’t stand for the use of technology simply because it exists. Just because we can do something does not mean we should. Instead, we must preserve the human element in our planning, actively discouraging clients and media partners from getting carried away with the false belief that they need instantaneous measures of results.

Faster is not always better, only faster.

Speed is meaningless in the context of how and why results are achieved. We should use technology to help us better understand the underpinnings of our results rather than simply to deliver a snapshot of the moment.

Too Much of a Good Thing?

More prospective clients are coming to direct-response marketing than ever before, putting a lot of pressure on available resources at agencies and in the media. This tends to drive scarcity of media and yield poorer results as we dilute the pool of clients with mediocre offers. Agencies need to become more guarded about what clients they accept and which they’re willing to place in media – especially on a per-inquiry basis.

My company has a policy of handling no more than three clients in a category. This effectively prevents us from defeating ourselves with our media partners, and it allows us to give each client unparalleled service and confidentiality. And we actively turn away business from companies that are in it only to make a buck. We evaluate every prospective client based upon how well we perceive they help their end consumer, our media partner and ourselves. If they don’t create a win-win-win, we typically decline the business, suggesting they’ll find success in other quarters.

Yes, it sounds heavy-handed – like we’re taking a “holier than thou” approach – yet we’ve found during the past nine years that we have few regrets about clients we’ve brought on board. Moreover, I sleep better at night at ease that we aren’t doing something harmful to others.

Don’t Fear the Moment

At this year’s Response Expo, I sensed a second type of sensory overload: panic. As economic growth slows, I’ve noticed desperation from clients and media to generate leads, leads, leads. There is a life-and-death mentality that has become almost palpable in the past year.

That’s simply not healthy – for the direct response industry or those of us working in it. Everyone needs to pause, take a breath and reflect that work is just one facet of a well-rounded life.

Remember that speed is not always a virtue. While technology offers us the opportunity to market more directly, and more efficiently, to an ever-larger audience, it’s still just a means to an end. With apologies to Marshall McLuhan, the medium is not the message our clients need to send.

We need to keep the focus where it belongs: on what our clients can do for prospective customers and what we can do for our clients and media.

Per-Inquiry Advertising Goes Mobile - 1213077720


HPM Can Beam Clients to Web-Enabled Handheld Devices

PHOENIX (June 9, 2008) — The per-inquiry (PI) advertising specialists at Higher Power Marketing (HPM) have made the jump to mobile media.

The agency has acquired the capability to convert radio commercials into text and graphic landing pages on WAP-enabled phones and handheld devices. WAP, or wireless application protocol, enables access to the Internet from a mobile phone or personal digital assistant (PDA).

“Those who have Blackberries, Palm phones or Windows Mobile phones and who surf the ’Net can now access our advertisers,” says Peter Feinstein, HPM’s president and chief executive officer. “When a mobile user finds an intriguing banner ad, he or she simply clicks on it. That either can send the browser to our client’s Web site or connect the phone to the advertiser’s call center.”

And this won’t eat into the user’s air time.

“This has absolutely no effect on their minutes,” Feinstein says. “They get this as a function of their mobile Web browsing. It’s very simple and very straightforward.”

The technology can deliver 100 million impressions a week, reaching mobile subscribers multiple times on the periphery of Web pages they visit.

HPM is one of the leading national firms specializing in PI, a form of direct-response advertising in which the client receives free ad time and space while paying only for results. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – print, radio, television and Web – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space. The agency acquires the rights to the unsold time and/or space for its clients, which pay only for qualified responses.

Feinstein says WAP-optimized Web sites are great platform for lead generation.

“This brings our advertisers a mobile, more-affluent, younger target market than traditional print or broadcast PI campaigns,” he says. “We’re very careful about who we bring to this marketplace. We’re constantly bombarded by advertisers interested in reaching this segment, but we’re careful about making sure the advertiser is a good fit for the medium and vice versa.”

This jibes with HPM’s corporate ethos – that good karma comes to those who follow the Golden Rule.

“We don’t just run an advertiser because we can,” Feinstein says. “We weigh each advertiser to make sure we’re doing the right thing for everybody in the process.”

Feinstein says the push into mobile advertising really gained strength at a direct-response marketing trade show last month.

“It was really a matter of meeting with the key players and solidifying what had been e-mail and telephone relationships into personal relationships,” Feinstein explains. “We were able to pre-qualify and get a number of new clients into this platform.”

HPM Hires New Media Development Director - 1216101780


Per-Inquiry Ad Agency Picks Roger Eon Jr. to Cultivate Media Partnerships

PHOENIX (July 14, 2008) — Higher Power Marketing has named Roger Eon Jr. to be its new director of media development.

“Roger will be taking a strategic view of developing HPM’s media network and working to cultivate new, significant media relationships,” said Peter Feinstein, president and chief executive officer of the per-inquiry (PI) advertising agency.

Eon has more than 14 years of direct-response experience in the Boston market. He is a noted media buyer and former agency co-owner who began his career with the National Science Foundation, working to create partnerships between major corporations and universities.

As HPM’s media development director, he will:

uncover media outlets that need to monetize unsold advertising inventory;

evaluate the advertising potential of media outlets that seek out HPM for help, as well HPM’s capacity to assist; and

cultivate relationships with existing media partners to improve the lead/sales generation performance of each based upon a strategic use of HPM’s proprietary Reach and Frequency media models, which predict accurately how many advertisers should be running at a given time on any given media outlet for optimal per-lead revenue potential.

“We want to make sure we’re bringing on media outlets that actually can benefit from our placing PI advertising with them,” Feinstein said. “Roger and I have established criteria that he will use to make recommendations to me on which outlets are the best fit for HPM and its clients.”

PI is a form of direct-response advertising in which the client receives free ad time and space while paying only for results. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television and print – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space. The agency acquires the rights to the unsold time and/or space for its clients, which pay only for qualified responses. The approach also is known as cost per lead (CPL), pay per lead (PPL) or cost per action (CPA).

In keeping with HPM’s practice of utilizing the best talent wherever that person may be living, Eon will represent the Phoenix-based agency from his East Coast offices.

A veteran of the Persian Gulf War, Eon is active in the International Retts Syndrome Foundation (www.rettsyndrome.org) on behalf of his stepdaughter, Chelsea.

Says Feinstein, “I’ve known Roger for several years and have admired his work ethic, his growth as a human being and his willingness to do whatever it takes to stay honest about any given situation so that everyone’s best interests are genuinely served.”

HPM Helps Sponsor Response Expo 2008 - 1209621840


Per-inquiry ad agency joins in key direct-marketing industry event

PHOENIX (April 30, 2008) — Per-inquiry (PI) advertising firm High Power Marketing (HPM) is a Choice Sponsor of the upcoming Response Expo 2008

Presented by the Direct Response Marketing Alliance (DRMA) and Response Magazine, Response Expo 2008 offers a trade show featuring space for more than 100 exhibitors, as well as a conference track of 12 seminars plus two strong keynote speakers. The event will be May 6-8 in San Diego.

“Sponsorship is an opportunity to put Higher Power Marketing’s name and logo in front of as many relevant eyes as possible,” says Peter Feinstein, the Phoenix-based firm’s president and chief executive officer.

“I’ve had so many years of sponsorship experience that I understand the value of having a presence,” Feinstein adds. “I receive comments from clients and business partners all year long that they see HPM everywhere – at the shows, in print, on the Web. It’s really designed to present HPM as the legitimate player we are.”

PI is a form of direct-response advertising in which the client receives free ad time and space while paying only for results. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television and print – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space. The agency acquires the rights to the unsold time and/or space for its clients, which pay only for qualified responses. The approach also is known as cost per lead (CPL), pay per lead (PPL) or cost per action (CPA).

What qualifies as a response is negotiated between client and PI advertising agency. Packages can be structured for a variety of results: per inquiry (any response), per lead (name and contact information) – even per sale.

When that direct response comes, HPM is ready with a turnkey solution for clients. It handles the call center services, tracks responses and arranges for fulfillment.

“Clients that would benefit from our services are those that would benefit from receiving qualified leads and want to establish a stable cost per lead within their business plan,” Feinstein says. “We give clients rock-solid numbers they can count on for lead generation in exchange for the flexibility in when and where the ads run.”

Feinstein calls PI risk-free advertising and is willing to put his money where his mouth is. HPM not only is one of the largest players in PI advertising, but also one of just a few that offer a money-back guarantee. It agrees to generate a specific number of inquiries during the course of each campaign. If it fails to produce the number of inquiries promised, it will refund the client’s money for the unproduced leads, less production costs and a 20 percent commission.

HPM Selects Operations Manager from Within - 1204178820


Clutch performance in January earns Stephanie Klein a promotion

PHOENIX (Feb. 27, 2008) — Higher Power Marketing has promoted Stephanie Klein to operations manager, putting her in charge of day-to-day functions at the per-inquiry advertising agency. “As HPM’s traffic manager for the past three years, Stephanie has demonstrated time and again the capacity for making great decisions that protect the company’s best interests while ensuring that clients, media partners and staff are treated with love, honor and respect,” said Peter Feinstein, the company’s president and chief executive officer.” Feinstein said Klein earned the promotion by providing leadership at a critical moment. When he underwent an emergency medical procedure in January, “Stephanie stepped in and made important business decisions that successfully kept the company running at a very high level. When I came back to work, I realized that she was performing beyond her traffic manager position, and that’s when I decided to offer her the operations manager post.”

In keeping with HPM’s practice of utilizing the best talent wherever that person may be living, Klein will oversee operations of the Phoenix-based agency from her home base in Marlton, N.J. It took only a few months of working with Feinstein for Klein to realize they shared the same philosophies for business and customer relations.

“I’ve often said that Peter and Higher Power were true examples of the reason that I chose to start working for myself doing virtual support” Klein says. “I’ve truly enjoyed the past three years, and I’m looking forward to my future with Higher Power Marketing as the operations manager.”

Per-inquiry advertising, or PI, is a form of direct-response advertising in which the client receives free ad time and space while paying only for results. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television and print – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space. The agency acquires the rights to the unsold time and/or space for its clients, which pay only for qualified responses. The approach also is known as cost per lead (CPL), pay per lead (PPL) or cost per action (CPA).

Calling Klein “an orchestrator at heart,” Feinstein said she has the perspective and judgment to make sure HPM’s operations run as smoothly as possible.

Ad Agency Lets Clients Direct Holiday Giving - 1195279860


For Thanksgiving, HPM Donates to Each Customer’s Cause

PHOENIX (Nov. 16, 2007) — Sick children, cancer research and vulnerable animals were on the minds of participants this year in High-Power Marketing’s unique, client-driven Thanksgiving campaign.

Rather than pursuing a “one size fits all” approach to annual gift giving, Phoenix-based HPM surveys its clients each October, asking which three charities they admire and support. Based upon client feedback, the per-inquiry (PI) advertising agency donates 1 percent of the year’s gross receipts from each client to one of that client’s three designated charities – in the client’s name.

“We find that our clients are all very big givers, to a wide variety of causes,” says HPM President and CEO Peter Feinstein.
The result: a three-in-one gift – aid to the charity, recognition for the client and the opportunity for HPM to expand its range of corporate giving.
This year, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, the American Cancer Society and The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) were among the top vote-getters, though 22 charities in all will benefit form HPM clients’ patronage.

“I feel strongly that a cookie-cutter gift wouldn’t accurately represent how HPM does business,” Feinstein says. “The best gift we can give to each of our clients is a donation made in their name to a cause they’re passionate about.” He says HPM received 100 percent response to the client survey. “Each client has their own unique story on how they came to support the charities that are near and dear to their hearts; as a relationship driven company, we make it our mission to help affirm their charitable connections.”

Then HPM goes a step further.
“Where key individuals from each client had charities that differed from the company’s charities,” Feinstein said, “we doubled our contribution by giving an equal amount, on behalf of the individual, to one of his or her named charities. In the end, we actually donated close to 5 percent of our gross sales for the year, up from 3 percent in 2006. Several of our clients have two or more key players we polled, and we wanted them all recognized.”

While undertaking this effort, HPM remained loyal to its own corporate charities: the American Cancer Society, the ALS Foundation, the American Red Cross and others, giving another 2 percent of its gross annual revenue.

Feinstein likes creating “win-win-win” situations, which come up regularly in PI advertising – also known as pay-per-lead (PPL) or direct-response (DR) advertising. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television and print – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space or time. A PI campaign puts ads in those spots until the agreed upon number of responses is reached, allowing a client to establish a stable, predictable cost per lead (CPL). The emphasis on results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs. “The client makes money; the media make money; and we make money,” Feinstein says. “Everybody wins.”

Per-Inquiry Marketing Boosts Two New Clients - 1195107180


Ad Agency Higher Power Marketing Sees Revenue Growth of 29 Percent

PHOENIX (Nov. 14, 2007) — Per-inquiry (PI) advertising firm Higher Power Marketing (HPM) is celebrating the success of two new clients: Premier Team International Inc. and Marriage Builders Inc. Buoyed by these and other clients, HPM’s revenue growth is up about 29 percent from last year.

Premier Team International (http://www.freedom22.com/), which markets a system for people wanting to work at home, has seen its response rate grow during the past year to 700-to-900 leads per week.

Marriage Builders (www.marriagebuilders.com), which offers couples counseling, signed on in September for a nationwide PI radio campaign. “We have very high expectations, and hopes for them developing into one of our largest clients,” says Peter Feinstein, HPM’s president and CEO.

The key to PI – a form of direct-response advertising also known variously as cost per lead (CPL), pay per lead (PPL) or cost per action (CPA) – is that the client receives free ad time and space while paying only for results.

HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print, Internet and billboards – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space. The agency acquires the rights to the unsold time and/or space for its clients, which pay only for qualified responses.

Debbie Combs, co-owner of Phoenix-based Premier Team International, says HPM’s per-inquiry approach has helped her company reach the markets it wants.
“What’s cool is that these are people who are serious,” Combs explains. “When we call them back, they’re waiting for our call. It’s just a high-quality lead.” The result? “It’s brought up our client base by at least 50 percent,” Combs says.

Marriage Builders is undertaking a nationwide PI radio campaign focused solely on lead generation. “They’re not counting on us to make sales, just to make the phones ring,” Feinstein says. “That’s perfect from our perspective, and from our media partners’ perspectives, because it’s all about generating leads.”

Ernie Hemple is a partner in Salt Lake City-based Rich Life Now, the agency that markets Marriage Builders. He likes PI advertising with HPM because: “We only pay for performance, and we’re getting a very good response.”

Hemple appreciates what Feinstein brings to the table in terms of experience and industry relationships. “Peter does something that takes a lot of work, planning and managing,” he says. “Not very many companies are able to do what Peter does. He’s probably the best.” Feinstein, in turn, appreciates a philosophical synergy between HPM and Marriage Builders.

“Not only do they bring a lot of business, they also help us fulfill one of our missions – helping people by bringing relief to their pain and suffering,” he says.
HPM’s PI strategy allows companies to boost business without the usual risks associated with advertising. A client can establish a stable, predictable CPL within its business plan, assuring a positive return on investment (ROI). HPM’s emphasis on PI and CPL results appeals to clients who care about how well advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs.

Get Fundraising Costs in Line with Results - 1185948900


Times are tough for professional fundraisers. Development officers at most colleges and universities are feeling the squeeze from rising costs and declining budgets.

To make matters worse, the reality of nonprofit fundraising is dwarfed by its poor image. Many alumni resist affiliation with their alma maters, hoping to duck appeals for money. Those that are open to giving want their generosity to benefit students directly, not pay for additional fundraising.

That usually isn’t the case with traditional direct-mail campaigns, in which the initial appeal is a loss leader serving merely to identify willing donors who can be approached again and again.

Zeroing In for Less

Finding those motivated donors – ones known to be interested in supporting your institution – is the key to lowering the cost of fundraising.

Thus, it makes more sense to adopt a strategy that starts with a low, stable cost to identify each motivated donor. Per-inquiry advertising (PI) – also known as cost-per-lead, pay-per-lead or cost-per-action – is a form of direct response marketing in which the advertiser receives free ad time and space and pays only for results. In return, the advertiser gives up control of where and when the ads will run.

Agencies that offer PI have relationships with media outlets – radio, television, print, Internet, movie screens and billboards – and access to their unsold inventory of ad time and space. The agency acquires the rights to the unsold time and/or space and places clients’ ads as it becomes available.

The advertisers pay only for qualified responses. What constitutes a response is negotiated between client and PI advertising agency. Packages can be structured for a variety of results: per inquiry (any response), per lead (name and contact information) – even per donation. The agency also can manage the plethora of toll-free numbers and dedicated Web addresses that make responses trackable.

PI appeals to organizations that would benefit from receiving qualified leads and want to establish stable costs per lead within their business plans. A PI agency can give them rock-solid numbers they can count on for lead generation in exchange for the flexibility in when and where the ads run. This approach is particularly suited to large, public institutions with high percentages of unaffiliated or loosely affiliated alumni within certain media markets.

Personal History

It was a nonprofit client that spurred my own interest in PI advertising. I was helping the group run radio advertising campaigns in the Southwest, buying local airtime in the traditional manner. The regional director was so pleased with the results we produced that he referred me to their national marketing manager, who offered me the chance to place national advertising but asked to pay per lead. The media companies we worked with were willing partners, accepting this client’s advertising on a pay-per-lead basis. The model has been so successful that we’ve applied it, with similar results, to several other nonprofit clients.

I’ve come to believe that colleges and universities really can benefit from pay-per-lead advertising. If an institution is going to spend money to generate donations, PI would be an ideal way for it to generate revenue with absolute certainty that it would not overspend to get the results.

Business Week Letter to the Editor - 1184134560


Dear Editor,

I read with interest Jon Fine’s column (“A Better Measure of Old Media?” MediaCentric, July 9) about the large, speculative investment Aribtron and some of its clients have made to try and determine return on investment (ROI) for television, radio and print advertising. Fine describes a complicated, costly approach that has yet to produce clear findings.

There is a much more cost-effective approach to assuring a stable, predictable ROI: per-inquiry advertising (PI). Also known variously as cost per lead (CPL), pay per lead (PPL) or cost per action (CPA), this is a form of direct response advertising in which the advertiser fills a media outlet’s unsold time or space and pays based upon the response. By necessity, the response must be tracked, so each ad offers a unique toll-free number or Web address for potential customers to reply. In the eight years I’ve been using PI, I’ve been 99.7 percent successful in tracking any particular client’s advertising campaign.

Best of all, the strategy is simple and relatively inexpensive. And as the Arbitron case study shows, the most expensive, high-tech solution isn’t always the best – particularly for businesses focused on the bottom line.

Peter Feinstein
CEO/President
Higher Power Marketing
Fountain Hills, Ariz.

Per-Inquiry Ad Firm Flips Paradigm for Growth - 1178518620


Three Hires in Two Months Lay Groundwork for New Business

PHOENIX (May 7, 2007) — Peter Feinstein, president and CEO of http://www.hpowermarketing.com [per-inquiry (PI) advertising] leader Higher Power Marketing (HPM), believes the path to growth should be paved, not potholed.

Most businesses, he says, hire based upon growth they’ve experienced. Playing catch-up hinders customer service as the companies struggle to reach the correct bandwidth.

“We’re hiring just in advance of the growth curve, so we’re in a great position to maintain customer service,” Feinstein says. “I try to hire to lead the company to growth. It allows me to improve processes, open new channels of distribution and make the company function more efficiently.”

HPM retained Chuck Edwards of Phoenix in April to manage accounts and operations, along with Janelle Hutter of Colorado Springs, Colo., to manage HPM’s database. Only a month earlier, the company hired Cindy Truitt of Dallas to handle radio sales and service. The company’s “virtual office” model allows it to tap talent from near and far.

“I can go months at a time without seeing the need to hire. But in the flash of a moment, I’ll get the inspiration to hire a person to fill a role,” Feinstein says. “It’s great the way the universe works – that the inspiration hits and within a day or two I receive a referral or a question about whether I’m looking for somebody. That’s what happened in these three instances.”

Edwards and Feinstein have known each other for 15 years, originally working together at KLDE-FM in Houston. After attending Arizona State University, Edwards worked in Albuquerque, N.M., and Charleston, W.Va., as well as Houston, before returning to the Phoenix area in 1999. Since then, he has worked with KYOT-AM/FM, Entravision Communications and his own company, CLE Enterprises.

“Chuck’s expertise is in listening to people and providing solutions based upon what he hears,” says Feinstein, who believes Edwards “fills a need in client relations so I don’t always have to be the face of the company.”

Hutter, HPM’s other April hire, brings more than 12 years of experience managing data operations in the direct-response (DR) industry – from managing toll-free number assignment processes to generating daily, weekly and monthly reporting for media outlets. She will oversee the day-to-day operations of HPM’s database.

The new hires bring management skills that enable Feinstein to focus back on strategy and growth opportunities. “The bigger the company gets, the more important the operational side becomes,” Feinstein says, adding that Hutter alone “saves me two hours a day.”

The key to PI – also known variously as http://www.hpowermarketing.com/whatwedo.asp [cost per lead] (CPL), http://www.hpowermarketing.com/howwedoit.asp [pay per lead] (PPL) or http://www.hpowermarketing.com/per_inquiry_tv.asp [cost per action] (CPA), in addition to DR – is that the client receives free ad time and space while paying only for results. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print, Internet and billboards – and access to their unsold inventory of ad space. The agency acquires the rights to the unsold time and/or space for its clients, which pay only for qualified responses. Thus, a client can establish a stable, predictable CPL within its business plan, assuring a positive return on investment (ROI).

Truitt, the Dallas-based advertising veteran who joined HPM in March, contacts radio networks, program syndicators and group-owned stations to see if they have unsold inventory they would like to monetize by airing HPM clients’ ads. She also makes sure those outlets have updated versions of clients’ commercials and the terms for their use.

HPM’s emphasis on PI and CPL results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs. Those clients come from a variety of business sectors, including:

Health insurance
IRS tax resolution
Structured settlements
Higher education
Mortgage
Credit counseling
Tort litigation
Home/lifestyle improvement

Business opportunities
Home care products
Travel vacation sales
Automotive aftermarket
Debt elimination
Information services
Weight-loss programs
Medical discount programs

HPM’s PI strategy allows companies to boost business without the usual risks associated with advertising.

Per Inquiry Advertising Agency Adds Radio Specialist - 1173248280


Industry veteran to place and manage ads with broadcast outlets

PHOENIX (March 6, 2007) —Sales executive Cindy Truitt of Dallas has joined Higher Power Marketing (HPM) to handle radio sales and service for the Phoenix-based per inquiry (PI) advertising agency.

The key to PI – also known variously as cost per lead (CPL), pay per lead (PPL), cost per action (CPA) or direct response (DR) – is that the client receives free ad time and space while paying only for results. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print, Internet and movie theaters – and access to their unsold inventory of ad space. The agency acquires the rights to the unsold time and/or space for its clients, which pay only for qualified responses. Thus, a client can establish a stable, predictable CPL within its business plan, assuring a positive return on investment (ROI).

Truitt’s role with HPM will be to contact radio networks, program syndicators and group-owned stations to see if they have unsold inventory they would like to monetize by airing HPM’s lead-generating clients. She also will make sure those outlets have updated versions of clients’ commercials and the terms for their use.

Truitt has enjoyed two decades in the advertising industry, including 12 years at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, where she sold local newspaper advertising – along with direct mail products and local magazines – and was named a Sales Person of the Year.

She later handled large accounts for Clear Channel Outdoor, generated new business for a Dallas-area radio station and managed the Internet arm of a TV production company. She has since established herself as an independent contractor specializing in Internet marketing and PI advertising.

“Cindy’s varied experience and clear understanding and love of the PI business make her a valuable addition to our growing team,” says HPM President and CEO Peter Feinstein. “She has worked on several projects, including a travel agent online lead-generation campaign for a major international cruise line and other Internet lead-generation and database-building campaigns.”

HPM’s emphasis on PI and CPL results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs. Those clients come from a variety of business sectors, including:

Health insurance
IRS tax resolution
Structured settlements
Higher education
Mortgage
Credit counseling
Tort litigation
Home/lifestyle improvement

Business opportunities
Home care products
Travel vacation sales
Automotive aftermarket
Debt elimination
Information services
Weight-loss programs
Medical discount programs

HPM’s PI strategy allows companies to boost business without the usual risks associated with advertising.

Per Inquiry Ad Process Becomes Cheaper, More Accessible - 1171606800


Advertisers can get results with 30 percent fewer toll-free numbers

PHOENIX (Feb. 15, 2007) — Improvements in Higher Power Marketing’s (HPM) proprietary per inquiry (PI) data processes are allowing clients to advertise through an increasing number of media outlets while paying less to track customer response.

The upgrades are making PI advertising more affordable – thus, more accessible – for would-be clients.

The key to PI – also known variously as cost per lead (CPL), pay per lead (PPL), cost per action (CPA) or direct response (DR) – is that the client receives free ad time and space while paying only for results. Arizona-based HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print, Internet and movie theaters – and access to their unsold inventory. The agency acquires the rights to the unsold time and/or space for its clients, which pay only for qualified responses. Thus, a client can establish a stable, predictable CPL within its business plan, assuring a positive return on investment (ROI). HPM is a leader in PI and one of only a few firms to offer a money-back guarantee on the per inquiry advertising it places (http://www.hpowermarketing.com/our_guarante.asp).

One advantage of PI advertising is that it’s trackable. HPM provides a turnkey package that includes exclusive toll-free numbers for potential customers to respond. When they do, the PI advertising agency’s contract call centers answer the incoming calls.

According to HPM President and CEO Peter Feinstein, the recent upgrades in the agency’s PI database-management processes can cut the number of toll-free numbers required by 30 percent. “Reducing the number of toll-free numbers required for a campaign results in quite a cost savings for clients. Fewer toll-free numbers means fewer versions of a commercial need to be produced,” Feinstein says. “It’s all about saving our clients money on the front end and helping them see a positive ROI on the back end.

HPM’s emphasis on PI or CPL results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs. Those clients come from a variety of business sectors, including:

Health insurance
IRS tax resolution
Structured settlements
Higher education
Mortgage
Credit counseling
Tort litigation
Home/lifestyle improvement

Business opportunities
Home care products
Travel vacation sales
Automotive aftermarket
Debt elimination
Information services
Weight-loss programs
Medical discount programs

By allowing clients to do more for less, HPM makes PI advertising accessible to companies interested in growing business without the usual risks associated with advertising.

The Gifts That Keep on Giving - 1166595660


Client-focused charity brings multiple benefits

PHOENIX (Dec. 19, 2006) — A Phoenix-area advertising agency has put a new twist on corporate giving this year, resulting in a “win-win-win” scenario for itself, its clients and a wide range of charities.

As the holidays approached, Higher Power Marketing (HPM), a Fountain Hills-based firm specializing in per inquiry (PI) advertising, decided to take a different approach to gift-giving. Instead of trying to come up with a “one size fits all” holiday gift for its clients, President and CEO Peter Feinstein was inspired by another idea. In October, he surveyed the company’s clients, asking which three charities they admired and supported.

“We actually received 100 percent response; every single client answered our request,” marveled Feinstein. “We found our clients are all very big givers, to a wide variety of charitable organizations.”

Based upon this client feedback, in mid-December HPM donated 1 percent of this year’s gross receipts from each client to one of that client’s three designated charities – in the client’s name.

The result: a three-in-one gift – aid to the charity, recognition for the client and the opportunity for HPM to expand its range of corporate giving.

Then HPM went a step further.

“Where key individuals from each client had charities that differed from the company’s charities,” Feinstein said, “we doubled our contribution by giving an equal amount, on behalf of the individual, to one of his or her named charities. In the end, we actually donated close to 3 percent of our gross sales for the year; several of our clients have two or more key players we polled, and we wanted them all recognized.”

While undertaking this effort, HPM remained loyal to its own corporate charities: the American Cancer Society, the ALS Foundation, the American Red Cross and others, giving another 2 percent of its gross annual revenue.

“I felt very strongly that a cookie-cutter gift wouldn’t accurately represent how HPM does business. The best gift we could give to each of our clients was a donation made in their name to one of their favorite charities,” Feinstein said. “As our clients have been made aware of our giving, they have expressed their gratitude and unwavering loyalty to HPM.”

Feinstein likes creating “win-win-win” situations, which come up regularly in PI advertising – also known as pay-per-lead or direct-response advertising. HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print, movie theaters and Internet – and access to their unsold inventories of ad space or time. A PI campaign puts ads in those spots until the agreed upon number of responses is reached. The emphasis on results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs. “The client makes money; the station makes money; and we make money,” Feinstein says. “Everybody wins.”

Mistakes to Avoid in Choosing an Ad Agency - 1163485320


Industry Insider Exposes Common Pitfalls of Would-Be Marketers

PHOENIX (Nov. 13, 2006) — Remember the cantina scene from Star Wars? The original, 1977 classic, that is. As the camera entered the exotic alien bar, the viewer’s senses were bombarded with all manner of sound, color and shape – a cacophony of stimuli that masked whatever nefarious business was going on under the tables.

Today, a similar experience awaits a businessperson seeking the most from his or her advertising buck. The 21st century media market is complex and multifaceted. Like a latter-day Han Solo, however, one veteran advertising exec is capable of leading clients around the most common traps.

Peter Feinstein, president and CEO of Arizona-based Higher Power Marketing, doesn’t believe choosing an advertising agency should be a high-risk endeavor. His company offers their clients a money-back guarantee. He’s also willing to expose the 11 most common mistakes in picking an ad agency:

Looking for cheap leads. You get what you pay for, Feinstein says, no matter what business you’re in. “You’ll know “cheap” if you hear it,” he explains. “You just can’t get something of value for nothing, or nearly nothing. So if prospective agency is promising it can get you the cheapest leads, buyer beware!”

Relying on one ad. According to the Electronic Retailing Association, the odds of a single ad working are about 26-to-1. Don’t let an agency sell you on a single concept. “It’s always safer to test two advertising messages, so you have some kind of a benchmark against which you can measure success and failure,” Feinstein says. “Failure, by the way, is not a dirty word. It helps you see exactly were you don’t need to go again.”

Producing a whole array of ads. You only need as many as you can test at one time. Usually two are sufficient. Says Feinstein: “Unless you’ve got money falling out of your pockets and don’t mind spending it on expensive ad production, save your money and find an ad agency that won’t take you for a ride.”

Expecting free media production. “Forget it,” Feinstein cautions. “It doesn’t exist.” Think about your business: Do you routinely give away a profitable segment? Probably not. “If an advertising agency is telling you it can get you media production for free, be sure to carefully inspect every agreement you make,” he warns. “You might be signing away ownership rights, giving a royalty on all sales for a period of time – or worse.”

Fixating on “creative.” Don’t be creative for the sake of being creative. What’s important is that an ad produces a measurable response. “Great creative produces a logical and emotional connection that moves a customer to act,” Feinstein says. “It does not add words or pictures unless they help achieve that goal.” Put another way, it doesn’t matter if people remember a commercial if it doesn’t make people pick up the phone or log onto a website.

Voicing your own commercials. Unless you’re better than a professional actor, don’t do it,” Feinstein advises. “Your ad won’t stand out the way you want. An agency that tells you differently is just scared of losing your business – and probably not to be trusted.” With so many professionally produced commercials out there, voice and presentation have to hit just the right notes for an ad to be successful.

Believing your vanity toll-free phone number will handle any response. That could be true only if you don’t care about tracking the sources of your calls, leads or sales. Depending upon your needs, a campaign might require between 10 and 80 toll-free numbers. You won’t know until you discuss your approach with a qualified agency.

Trying to do without a call center. “Be wary of any agency that downplays the importance of a call center, sounds unwilling to handle it or says that you don’t need one,” Feinstein says. “That’s nonsense.” A call center is critical to tracking response to any campaign.

Believing that everybody wants your product. If you’ve run into an agency that is telling you only what you want to hear, chances are they’re lying. “The truth is, no one – and I mean no one – is as passionate about your product or service as you are,” Feinstein says. “But that doesn’t mean a lot of people won’t want it. It just means you’re going to have to work to get it in front of them in such a way that they are persuaded to buy it.”

Feinstein’s agency, Higher Power Marketing, specializes in per inquiry (PI) advertising – also known as pay-per-lead or direct-response advertising. It has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print, movie theaters and Internet – and access to their unsold inventory. The emphasis on results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs. “The client makes money; the station makes money; and we make money,” Feinstein says. “Everybody wins.”

What qualifies as a response is negotiated between client and PI advertising agency. Packages can be structured for a variety of results: per inquiry (any response), per lead (name and contact information) – even per sale.

But Feinstein warns that even in his niche, would-be advertisers often bring misconceptions:

Expecting to generate 500 leads in the first week. PI advertising runs on a space-available basis, which means an ad might not even run for a week or two. And elections, such as the one that just occurred, can suck up all of the inventory. “The watchword for lead generation in PI is patience,” Feinstein explains. “Once your advertising starts, it will be easier to gauge how long it will take to produce a certain level of leads.”

Thinking there are no guarantees in advertising. Feinstein’s agency not only is one of the largest players in PI advertising, but also one of just a few that offer a money-back guarantee. It agrees to generate a specific number of inquiries during the course of each campaign. If it fails to do so, it will refund the client’s money for the unproduced leads, less production costs and a 20 percent commission. In its seven-plus years, the agency has had to deliver on that money-back guarantee only a couple of times, but Feinstein says even those experiences weren’t all bad. “They’ve actually helped us get new clients by demonstrating that we’re true to our word. The folks at one company recognized it wasn’t a good fit for them – but referred other companies that have become HPM clients, because they recognized direct response advertising as a good business proposition and were impressed that we’d kept our word.”

With Feinstein’s tips in mind, go forth and advertise. And may the Force be with you.

Per Inquiry Advertising Boosts Marketing Firm - 1154413500


Clients embrace risk-free, pay per lead strategy that yields direct responses

PHOENIX (July 31, 2006) — Showing businesses how they can spend less on advertising has propelled Higher Power Marketing (www.hpowermarketing.com) to a year of stellar growth – boosting revenue 400 percent from June 2005 to June 2006. Suddenly, the seven-year-old advertising agency finds itself billing in the low seven figures annually.

President and CEO Peter Feinstein says HPM’s emphasis on results appeals to clients who care about how well their advertising works, not necessarily when or where it runs. He says companies are accustomed to paying more for advertising because they divide the cost of expensive airtime or print space by the number of customer responses and arrive at a de facto cost per lead or sale; “Our methodology starts with a static cost per lead or sale, from which many of our clients experience returns on investment (ROI) of up to 20-to-1.”

“Clients that would benefit from our services are those that would benefit from receiving qualified leads and want to establish a stable cost per lead within their business plan,” Feinstein says. “We give clients rock-solid numbers they can count on for lead generation in exchange for the flexibility in when and where the ads run.”

How It Works

“What if you could be on TV or radio for free – pop up on movie screens across the country?” Feinstein asks. With his approach, advertising is free because clients pay for results.

HPM has relationships with media outlets across the country – radio, television, print, movie theaters and Internet – and access to their unsold inventory. “The client makes money; the station makes money; and we make money,” Feinstein says. “Everybody wins.”

The approach is called, variously, per inquiry (PI), pay per lead or direct response advertising. What qualifies as a response is negotiated between client and PI advertising agency. Packages can be structured for a variety of results: per inquiry (any response), per lead (name and contact information) – even per sale.

Feinstein calls it risk-free advertising and is willing to put his money where his mouth is. HPM not only is one of the largest players in PI advertising, but also one of just a few that offer a money-back guarantee. The Arizona-based agency agrees to generate a specific number of inquiries during the course of each campaign. If it fails to produce the number of inquiries promised, it will refund the client’s money for the unproduced leads, less production costs and a 20 percent commission.

In its seven-plus years, the agency has had to deliver on that money-back guarantee only a couple of times, but Feinstein says even those experiences weren’t all bad. “They’ve actually helped us get new clients by demonstrating that we’re true to our word. The folks at one company recognized it wasn’t a good fit for them – but referred us other clients because they recognized direct response advertising as a good business proposition and were impressed that we’d kept our word.”

Full Service Agency

Higher Power Marketing works with clients from start to finish. It wants them to start with two very different advertising concepts that to seek to arrive at the same conclusion – getting the phone to ring or a sale to occur. They do this to see which one works better.

Says Feinstein: “In our world: Test, test, test. We are always testing commercials. Then we run one for a while and test again.” The feedback, he says, is integral to staying ahead of the curve.

“We have professional copywriters that literally do nothing but write ads specifically focused on producing results,” Feinstein says. “We do not do creative for the sake of being creative. We are direct-response oriented.”

He pauses a moment, then elaborates: “In our world ‘creative’ is a noun. We are doing creative to produce measurable results – to sell products. We want the client spending their money for lead generation, not fancy, flowery ads that don’t produce results. We give them professional quality production that they own.”

The result? “We make the phone ring with qualified leads, or we persuade potential customers to visit a Web site,” Feinstein says.

Most importantly, this is trackable advertising. Higher Power provides exclusive toll-free numbers and Web addresses for potential customers to respond.

When that direct response comes, the PI advertising agency is ready with a turnkey solution for clients. It handles the call center services and details, from obtaining toll-free numbers to scripting; from testing the call center systems for functional operation to training the people who will be answering. The agency draws from the nine largest call center systems in the country, which collectively have more than 600 regional offices in place to manage calls from every corner of the United States, and Canada too.

To make things even easier for clients, the agency arranges fulfillment house solutions as well.

Low Overhead

Feinstein has a regular staff of nine, plus a couple of creative people. To keep overhead costs down, the company operates on a virtual basis, with everyone on staff remote networked from their own offices. Audio, video and graphic work is outsourced.

About 47 percent of the agency’s business is per inquiry television advertising, 31 percent per inquiry radio advertising and 15 percent per inquiry Internet advertising. Print and movie screens make up the remaining 7 percent, though Feinstein believes movie screens will be a growing sector.

He estimates that the company’s recent growth has doubled its client base to 43. Those clients fall primarily into 14 categories:

Health insurance
IRS tax resolution
Structured settlements
Higher education
Mortgage
Credit counseling
Tort litigation

Home/lifestyle improvement
Business opportunities
Home care products
Travel vacation sales
Automotive aftermarket
Debt elimination
Medical discount programs

Feinstein also believes the non-profit sector could benefit from pay-per-lead advertising. “If they are spending money to generate donations, our system would be an ideal way for them to generate revenue and have absolute certainty that they would not overspend to get the results,” he says.

In fact, it was a non-profit client that spurred the longtime radio ad man’s interest in PI advertising.

He was helping the group run radio advertising campaigns in the Southwest, buying local airtime in the traditional manner. “We were doing such a good job for them, the regional director referred us to their national marketing manager,” Feinstein says. “He offered us the chance to place national advertising but asked to pay per lead.”

Thus, listening to the customer has paid off for Feinstein and Higher Power Marketing. More importantly, HPM’s systematic approach to converting an expense line item into a predictable investment that provides an ROI could pay off for companies interested in growing their businesses without the usual risks associated with advertising.

New Partnership Offers Clients More Access to Southern California - 1396302120


PHOENIX (March 31, 2014) — Higher Power Marketing is partnering with one of Southern California’s biggest newspaper companies to give clients greater access to four contact-rich counties in the region.

Under the deal, HPM’s cost-per-action (CPA) clients will have the opportunity to advertise in publications circulating in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.
The deal is only for print, though online could be added later. Combined 2013 circulation figures for the participating newspapers is approximately 450,000 on weekdays and 500,000 on Sundays
“I’m proud to offer our clients an additional gateway to one of the most lucrative markets in the country, Southern California,” says Peter Feinstein, HPM’s president and CEO. “If things go as I expect, these newspapers will be among our premium partners.”
HPM has relationships with a vast number of media outlets and access to their unsold inventory. HPM assists their media outlets in monetizing their unsold inventory by paying them on a cost per action (CPA) basis. CPA advertising is also known as per-inquiry (PI), pay-per-call (PPC) or direct-response (DR) advertising.
Essentially the unsold inventory of the media outlet is filled with advertisements from HPM’s clients. Clients aren’t billed for the placement of their ads; rather, they pay based on the number of responses to their ads.

###
For more information, visit www.hpowermarketing.com or contact Peter Feinstein at 888-501-5544 or peterf@hpowermarketing.com.

FluentStream Helps Higher Power Marketing Work Completely Virtually - 1407780660


https://www.fluentstream.com/fluentstream-helps-higher-power-marketing-work-completely-virtual/#.VFpTq0vUMfM

Whether Terrestrial, Satellite or Online, DR Marketers Can Find a Power Captive Audience Among Today's Radio Listeners - 1392660780


http://www.responsemagazine.com/direct-response-marketing/radio-renaissance-6858

DRMA Member of the Year Nomination - 1448057700


The Direct Response Marketing Alliance (DRMA) has named Phoenix advertising executive Peter Feinstein a finalist for its 2015 Member of the Year Award.

Feinstein, president and CEO of Higher Power Marketing, is one of eight nominees for the award, which salutes an employee or leader of a DRMA member company who has exemplified and promoted the best and most-consistent values of the performance-based marketing business.

“Every day, through their actions and efforts, these nominees work to better … our industry and the DRMA,” says John Yarrington, co-founder of the group and publisher of Response magazine, which co-sponsors the award.

DRMA members will vote by email for the winner, who will be announced Dec. 8 during the organization’s Winter Bash in New York.

Feinstein has taken on a number of roles within direct-response marketing and the DRMA:
Feinstein says he is honored and grateful for his nomination: “I’m an evangelist for ‘commerce with a conscience,’ – including cross-media accountability, development of strategic business partnerships and industry innovation through the vetting of technology before application – and a consistent advocate for business ethics.”

  • • Semi-regular guest columnist for Response Magazine.
  • • Regular contributor of case studies to the DRMA/Response website.
  • • Blogger from, and annual sponsor of, Response Expo.
  • • Active member of DRMA
  • • Social-media thought leader, commenting regularly about industry issues on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.
  • • Originator of “The HPM Bridge,” a formula that closes the gap between clients’ and media partners’ payment preferences, ensuring that everybody is paid when they want.
  • • Provider of free online educational videos introducing DR to potential advertisers.

Higher Power Marketing has an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau and has been nominated for the BBB’s Torch Award for Ethics four times in the past five years. It also made the 2010 Inc. 500|5000 list, Inc. magazine’s annual measure of entrepreneurial success, and was named Best in Business for Marketing Consulting in 2009, 2013 and 2014 by the Small Business Commerce Association.

###

For more information, visit www.hpowermarketing.com or contact Peter Feinstein at 888-501-5544 or pf@hpowermarketing.com

HPM’s Feinstein Joins ‘Response’ Advisory Board - 1478791440


Response magazine has named Phoenix businessman Peter Feinstein, president and CEO of Higher Power Marketing, to its Advisory Board.

Feinstein has been frequent guest columnist for the monthly trade publication. Response is affiliated with the Direct Response Marketing Alliance, which in 2015 named Feinstein a finalist for its Member of the Year award.

“Peter’s dedication to this industry, his leadership in it and his work for the magazine in recent years as a recurring contributor make a compelling case for his inclusion on the board. However, it’s his wisdom and spirit of service that our team believed set him apart as a candidate,” said Thomas Haire, the magazine’s editor-in-chief. “I look forward to working closely with Peter in expanding the breadth and depth of Response‘s coverage of the performance-based marketing industry.”

Feinstein says he will focus on making industry coverage topical.

“I’ll work to keep the relevant stuff out front and make sure we don’t lose sight of offline media in a world that seemingly has become more online-focused,” he says. “This is an opportunity to express my views and keep the conversation focused on direct response, not technology.”

Advisory Board members offer suggestions for the magazine’s editorial calendar, are expert sources for the magazine’s writers and take part in nominations for the DRMA’s annual awards. They also propose topics for, and sometimes moderate, educational sessions at Response Expo, the key annual conference for people in the direct-response marketing industry.

“I am happy to serve as a resource for Response in its coverage of the industry, as well as the staging of the annual Response Expo,” Feinstein says. “It’s also a wonderful opportunity to have a direct influence and impact on the DRMA relative to how it interacts with its membership.”

Feinstein also is a longtime advocate for what he calls “commerce with a conscience” – cross-media accountability, quality business partnerships and innovation. He blogs and comments about industry issues regularly on LinkedIn.